What would happen life after death

People have been conditioned to perceive death as a conclusion to the experience of life throughout history and throughout cultures. Advances in resuscitation science and critical care medicine, on the other hand, have cast doubt on the finality of death. Sam Parnia, Director of the Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Division at New York University Langone Medical Center, recently talked to the New York Academy of Sciences on his resuscitation science study. Dr. Parnia’s study elucidates how death is a process rather than an absolute, and what happens when patients experience death, as he explains in his own words:

 

When the heart stops beating, death occurs. This is known as death by cardiopulmonary criteria, and that is how more than 95 percent of individuals die. All life processes come to a halt when a person ceases breathing and their brain shuts down. Doctors like me can now maintain a patient’s heart beating longer because to the development of contemporary critical care medicine and the capacity to artificially keep people’s hearts pumping.

People who have experienced irreparable brain injury and brain death may find themselves in a scenario where their brain has died but their heart continues to beat, in which case they are legally proclaimed dead based on irreversible brain death, or death by brain death criteria. Only a limited percentage of the time does this happen.

For millennia, death was thought to be an irrevocable occurrence that could not be reversed. We’ve discovered in the last decade that the cells within a person’s body, including the brain, begin their own dying process only after they’ve perished. We used to assume that if you didn’t get enough oxygen, your brain cells would die in five or ten minutes, but we now know that’s not true.

After death, you have hours, if not days, before your brain and other organs are irrevocably destroyed. It’s the reintroduction of oxygen and blood flow into organs after a person’s heart has stopped but been resuscitated that causes rapid cell death. So, in medicine, we must now tackle this faster secondary damage process.

After death, you have hours, if not days, before your brain and other organs are irrevocably destroyed. It’s the reintroduction of oxygen and blood flow into organs after a person’s heart has stopped but been resuscitated that causes rapid cell death. So, in medicine, we must now tackle this faster secondary damage process.

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